Phone safety

PHONE SAFETY

Mobile phone security should be of utmost concern to anyone. Today, cell phones store not only text messages and phone numbers but appointments, tasks, photographs, and multimedia as well. Already there are destructive viruses out there that delete ll data on the phone and in some cases even make the instrument itself inoperable.

Then again, if a virus doesn’t get your phone, a thief might. In the event your phone gets stolen, the information on it is accessible by anyone unless you’ve taken steps to secure it.

The first thing to do when you buy a phone is to make sure that both SIM and phone locks are enabled. The SIM lock is primarily meant to prevent call misuse. Every time the phone is started, you will need to enter the password before the SIM card attempts to connect to the network.

Make sure that both the SIM and phone locks are enabled. The SIM lock is primarily meant to prevent call misuse. Every time the phone is started, you will need to enter the password before the SIM card attempts to connect to the network.

Since the SIM lock is essentially a network lock, it will stay on even if you use the SIM card in another phone. Although it may seem inconvenient, it will save you precious money if you lose your phone.

Enabling the phone lock is a good option as well. The contents of the phone will simply be inaccessible unless the phone lock password is entered correctly.

Every cellular device on the globe is assigned a unique international mobile equipment identity (IMEI) that is used by GSM networks to keep track of the devices. When you buy a new phone, note down your IMEI number which will be mentioned on the retail box.

If you’ve chucked the box already, you can still find out the IMEI number by punching in *#06# on your mobile phone.

If you happen to misplace your device, immediately inform the cellular network in question and give them the phone’s IMEI number. In many countries the phone can be blocked completely off the network, rendering it unusable.

Installing anti-virus and encryption software on your smart phone is also something to consider. Anti-virus software is especially important if you use your smart phone to surf the net, and send/receive email over GPRS. For example Symantec, makers of the popular Norton anti-virus software, have released anti-virus versions for both Window-based smart phones such as the O2 XDA and Atom, and for Symbian OS series 60 and series 80 phones. Most Nokia mid-range and high-end phones conform to these specifications. F-Secure also make anti-virus software for Symbian OS 60 phone and is a recommended product.

Finally, Bluetooth, a popular wireless communication protocol, is increasingly becoming a convenient tool for hackers to retrieve data from PDAs, smart phones and the like. Bluetooth-based attacks are mostly due to the fact most users forget to turn it off after use. The lesson to be learnt here is to shut off Bluetooth immediately after you’ve finished transferring data and deny any incoming request such as business cards from unknown devices. Or, simply deny request that you aren’t sure of.