Why take them for granted?

One find Wednesday afternoon, Anjali, got a call from a very renowned company from the Telecom sector, the HR Executive on the other side of the phone asked her to appear for  an interview on Friday. In Anjali’s current office she was loaded with work being the year end, so she asked the HR Executive if she could appear for the interview some time next week but she was informed that the vacant position needed to be filled within that week i.e. by Friday.

Finally she agreed to appear for the interview on Friday itself, and she applied for leave as the interview was scheduled outside her current city.

Friday morning very enthusiastically she got ready for the interview and boarded the train for Pune from Mumbai, around 11.30am she reached the given address for her interview and got in touch with the same HR Executive who in turn asked her to wait for some time as the senior manager was busy in some other meeting. Around 12.30 she asks about the availability of senior managers and is told that the guy would not be able to take her interview as he had not yet reached the office. So she asked the HR executive why they had called her if the Sr. Manager was already busy. And the executive very politely tells her that his boss asked him to call her so he made the call and he himself did not know anything else about it. Again she was asked to wait for some time, till they decided who would take her interview.

Around 2.30 finally she is called in to one of the cabins only to see that the Assistant Manager was taking the interview. Questions she was asked could have been very well done in the telephonic interview.

Does this story sound similar to your own story?

Have you come across such HR professionals, who will make you wait for such long hours only to never turn up for the meeting?

The interviewer should not make a candidate wait for more than five minutes; sometimes this cannot be avoided so at least offer the person coffee while they are waiting and explain the situation. E. Elizabeth Carter President Carter Consultants Ltd.

But do we all make sure of all that Elizabeth had to say? Especially in this case when Anjali, was called for the interview stating that the position was to be filled urgently by Friday, and the person in question was not even there for the meeting.

You all may think that an urgent work can come at the last minute, then what should be done? Plan ahead; if you are an interviewer, some work comes suddenly and you know you cannot take the interview, let the AM or anyone else fill in the gaps for you, which was what eventually happened in the above mentioned case.

Look from this perspective now, if at 11:30am when Anjali reached the venue, the HR executive tells her that Sir will not be available for this meeting as he has to go for some other urgent work please wait till our AM comes for the meeting.

Maximum by 11:50 the interview should have started. Anjali would have walked out of the office premises happily and not been disgruntled with the Sr. Manager for wasting one complete day.

Being in HR department actually calls for a behavior which everyone wants to replicate, become a role model, and lead the entire organization in all these areas specifically. If your time is important so is the candidates’, in this case it is even more as Anjali traveled from Mumbai to Pune for the interview, also because she thought it would be an opportunity to work for a Reputed Company. But what happened in the company and with her- do you think that she would carry a positive outlook about the company? The answer is NO, which is how I got to know about this case and thought of putting it down just to inform you all that being in HR does not mean that we can take every one for granted.

So be careful, if you are one of those HR Managers or Interviewer who makes people wait for undue long hours and does not even offer an apology forget about a cup of coffee.

  • chetna sabharwal

    Nice example and I am sure this is the story of many other interviewees as we in India still need to understand the nitty griities of the organisational behaviour specifically on the part of recruiters. An article or discussion on work culture might help……….

  • Rahul

    I think Archna has brought very relevant point through this article. I can actually sense it as even I have faced such issues in my career and at the end what I received is not the good image of such organizations. Time is precious for both either it is interviewer or interviewee. Such issues also talk about the behavior of the organization as whole. One can understand the tight schedules but there shouldn’t be any harm if candidates are well informed. In many cases the things which can be done over telephone talk, candidates are called unnecessary to the premises. Here I am not objecting the usefulness of face to face interviews but there are certain basics which can be resolved over a small 10 – 15 mins talk which can save organization’s as well as candidate’s time and money. If organization shows the urgency of hiring they should display it during the selection process. Due to unavoidable reasons if such things even happen hospitality is something remains in heart of the candidates. Being into HR we all should ensure dignity of organization and people both.

  • Abinayasri

    hi even i have faced such a situation at the time of my interview .i will be waiting for hours .at one stage my positive opinion about the company is changed.Every company should maintain the interview time schedule.