A Lost Art Found Online

Stamp collecting, ground post and letter writing, together, have had a shifting status in the wake of this meme, or mass idea, of ‘snail mail’. It appears that speed is paramount in today’s communication, not surprisingly.


Therefore the art forms of our older handmade communication, like stamps, have more historical significance and perhaps more interest than when they reigned as central tools.






Emails don’t require postage because they are free to send. It’s as if online correspondence became a social standard, a personal right. It’s really quite hard to argue with that. But what if our emails had some sort of stamp option?


In a way, it would be redundant for Google or Yahoo to provide an ‘Attach stamp’ button, although fun, since we already have the regular attachment function. So, go ahead and affix any image you want as your next email’s stamp! You could begin making your own e-stamp designs.


If that seems a bit silly, even though you love stamp collecting, then it brings up some vital advantages of hand-crafted correspondence.




The Lost Art

The truth is, stamp art and stamps themselves belong to an age when the distribution of images in general was a fraction of what’s happening today online. Can you imagine living in a society in which seeing art or pictures was still a rare treat?


With our new appetite and consumption of imagery (at the same time as we write and read emails!) the visual cache of a lovely stamp is less impressive, although our appreciation can be more nostalgic now.


But, on the other hand, there are some aspects of stamps that bode well for their continued interest in the current fast age. For example, they are small and easily and quickly admired. This is very engaging, because stamps usually combine high resolution, if you will, and detail with their small size.




Stamps and Slots

All in all, stamps and letters are most fun when physically handled and admired, to see the light changing upon the surface of the paper and ink. But that doesn’t mean we’re down on the idea that stamps can live on and prosper with the Web.


Take something else that was originally very physical, tactile, in-person and ‘real’: pulling the lever of a casino’s slot machine. This, too, has re-emerged stronger than ever at online classy casinos where people don’t mind the modern adaptations.

Actually, friends, we’re quite excited about all the new ways to enjoy stamps both offline, in your hands, and on your screens, too!