Dual Employment or a Part-Time Job

“I am a quality in-charge in an electronics manufacturing services( EMS). I am still considered as graduatee trainee. I have received an offer to work for medical billing organisation (MNC). Can I work both for the factory as well as the call center on a same day? Please suggest me.”

Assuming that you have accounted the work time required to deliver the jobs, at both the work places, what motivates you to take the second job? Have you considered the growth prospects? How far is it aligned to what you want to become in next financial year?

To begin with every Part time job is not a Dual Employment. From a talent’s perspective, balancing career expectations from the job may not always happen from one job. Such as a Faculty who teaches at an MBA college would run a Management consultancy offering expert guidance on real life industrial problems. This is not a dual employment . Its actually an arrangement, where one job supports the other. Working through real life problems help the Faculty remain relevant. Whereas, the research require to teach students, makes him an unchallengeable consultant to the industry.

Dual employment by definition, is to offer the same skill-sets, for what one is hired, to more than one employer. It also has to do with the number of work-hours spent. Such as, a sales man cannot sell product for two different company at the same point of time. Thats dual employment. However, an IT Engineer teaching classical dance beyond work hours for profitable gain will not be dual employment, as the skill required for both the work places are entirely different. A school teacher managing a private tutorial to teach the students from the same school, would be a dual employment for sure! Offering the same sets of skills for which you are hired for profitable gains, would account for dual employment.

At your situation, the first job needs an in-depth know-how of electronic machines. Benchmarking them to the standards of quality is what you are offering. Does these machines have anything to do with health or medicines?

On the other hand, the medical billing process, will require you to work on processing documents. It will require you to have skills for identifying, indexing, tagging, online-filing or even defining the documents. None of these skills require the knowledge from your primary job.

Alternatively, the employer at the Medical Billing Process have nothing to worry about you, as you cannot be using the knowledge of billing documentation at the factory.

However, working at two different establishments, both registered under Shops and Establishment Act is a point to ponder. Please disclose your intentions to both of your employers. Share why do you need both the jobs. You may need them for a greater cash flow and career aspirations. Please be crystal clear about it. Negotiate on how it cannot be achieved from one workplace. Share a detailed plan on how you would manage your time and attention?

Have anyone from the factory ever managed a part time job? Research on how people with part time jobs at the factory have managed to convince the employer. Prepare your data and work closely with your reporting managers at the factory, on how effective you would continue to remain even after working at the call-centre.

Speak openly about your monetary conditions if that is the reason for the second job. If your employer cannot meet the monetary needs you may have, they might allow you to take up the role. A salary hike would be a percentage of your salary not double the salary. Any amount of over time at the factory might still not be enough. Put these points to them.

Take a big picture look. Understand where you want to reach in your career and how. Ultimately at the end of the day, any job that you do will make you better for your next role. Identify what competencies from each job will help you build it. Each role we take opens up to a potential we never knew we had.

Wish you all the best!

As discussed on: Dual employment