The basics of Career Management

Career

The occupational positions a person has had over many years.

Career management

The process for enabling employees to better understand and develop their career skills and interests and to use these skills and interests more effectively

Career development

The lifelong series of activities that contribute to a person’s career exploration, establishment, success and fulfillment

Career planning

The deliberate process through which someone becomes aware of personal skills, interests, knowledge, motivations, and other characteristics and establishes action plans to attain specific goals.

We may define career as the occupational positions a person has had over many years. Many people look back on their careers, knowing that what they might have achieved they did achieve, and that their career goals were satisfied. Others are less fortunate and feel that, at least in their careers their lives and their potential went unfulfilled.

Employers have a big effect on employers’ careers. Some institute formal career management processes, while others do little. We can define career management as a process for enabling employees to better understand and develop their career skills and interests and to use skills and interests most effectively both within the company and after they leave the firm. Specific career management activities might include providing realistic career oriented appraisals, posting open jobs and offering formal career development activities. Career development is the lifelong series of activities (such as workshops) that contribute to a person’s career exploration, established success and fulfillment. Career planning is the deliberate process through which someone becomes aware of his or her personal skills, interests. Knowledge, motivations, and other characteristics; acquires information about opportunities and choices identifies career related goals and establishes action plans to attain specific goals.

Career Development Today

Career planning and development

The deliberate process through which a person becomes aware of personal career related attributes and the lifelong series of steps that contribute to his or her career fulfillment.

This shift in philosophy means that many employers have strengthened the career focus of their human resources activities. The focus is no longer just, how can you best serve our company? Today the reality for most people is that they’ll have to change employers (and perhaps careers) several times during their work lives. Employees therefore expect activities like section, training and appraisal to serve their own longer term career needs, too. The emphasis now is thus on using HR activities and milestones (like annual appraisals) to facilitate career self analysis, development and management. Table summarizes how employers can use activities such as training and appraisal to support such a career planning and development focus.

Table

Traditional Vs Career Development Focus

HR activity

Human resource planning

Traditional Focus: Analyzes jobs, kills, tasks – present and future. Project needs. Uses statistical data.

Career Development Focus: Adds information about individual interests, preferences, and the like to replacement.

Recruiting and placement
Traditional Focus: matching organization’s needs with qualified individuals.

Career Development Focus: Matches individual and jobs based on variables including employees’ career interests and aptitudes.

Training and development

Traditional Focus: Provides opportunities for learning skills, information, and attitudes related to job.

Career Development Focus: Provides career path information. Adds individual development plans.

Performance appraisal

Traditional Focus: Ratings and /or rewards.

Career Development Focus: Adds development plans and individual goal setting.

Compensation and benefits

Traditional Focus: Rewards for time, productivity, talent and so on.

Career Development Focus: Adds tuition reimbursement plans, compensation for non-job related activities such as United Way.

Career development programs needn’t be complicated. Employees report that receiving performance feedback having individual development plans, and having access to non technical skills training would probably reduce the likelihood they’d leave their firms. Yet only about a fourth of the respondents in one survey had individual development plans.

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    nice