Seiton operations – Machine Setting

Seiton operations involve taking the materials, parts, tools metal moulds etc for the main operation from their assigned storage places and carrying them to the work table or machinery facilities, and laying them out in order so that preparation and machine setting operations can be done easily.

Preparation and machine setting operations include laying out materials in the order they are to be used and in a position which is convenient for operations, attaching necessary tools and parts to machinery, laying out tools to be used in the order in which they are used, loading materials into machinery facilities, placing materials so that machinery can be re-loaded easily, and making practice runs and checks on poka yoke (fool-proofing) functions. Buy doing this, any problem can be identified and improved easily.

Seiton operation – Preparation and tool setting operations – Production operations

Bad Seiton

1. Searching for items necessary for preparation and tool setting operations takes time and energy
2. Preparation and tool operations jigs and tools and parts are stored all together.
3. Search for items which are necessary for preparation and tool-setting operations and production operations s they become necessary
4. Leave machinery and facilities frequently
5. Time is used. Operations suffer.
6. Fetch parts during operation. Fetch changes for jigs and tools and cutting tools. Halts in operations occur.
7. Leave machinery and facilities frequently.
8. Production takes time. Production does not increase.

Good Seiton:

1. Parts and tools necessary for preparation and tool-setting operations and production operations are assembled at one time and transported.
2. Items are arranged in order of use in preparation and tool-setting operations.
3. Little time is used.
4. Check items which are necessary for preparation and tool-setting operations and production. Check their order.
5. Continue operations without having to leave machinery or facilities.
6. Use parts and materials in the order in which they are placed to do operations in their correct order. No Halts in operations.
7. Continue operations without having to leave machinery or facilities.
8. Total time necessary for production decreases and production increases.

Waste and loss in Seiton operations and preparation and machine-setting operations:

In Seiton Operations 

Wastes:

(a) Wasted times,

i) Searching takes time.
ii) Having idling time
iii) Fetching takes time.

Losses:

i) Increased operating cost
ii) Production decrease
iii) Increased operating cost
iv) Production decrease

(b) Wasted things,

i) Extra items are bought
ii) Items are deleted but are still bought

Losses:

i) Increased interest,
ii) Increased operating costs

(c) Waste from defects and breakdowns:-

i) The wrong parts are fetched and defects occur
ii) The wrong jigs and tools are fetched and breakdowns occur

Losses:

i) Increased operating costs
ii) Production decrease
iii) Increased operating costs
iv) Production decrease

(c) Wasted space

i) Space is taken up by extra things

Losses:

i) Increased operating costs

In preparation and tool-setting operations 

(a) Wasted time

i) Parts have to be fetched time after time
ii) Jigs and tools have to be fetched time after time

Losses:

i) Increased operating costs
ii) Production decrease

(b) Wasted things

i) Items are not returned soon, appear to be lost, and are bought
ii) Items are not searched for and bought

Losses:

i) Increased operating costs
ii) Increased interest
iii) Production decrease

(c) Waste from defects and breakdowns

i) The wrong jigs and tools or metal moulds are loaded creating defects or breakdowns.
ii) Unnecessary things are placed around machine facilities.

Losses:

i) Increased operating costs

(d) Wasted space

i) Jigs and tools and metal moulds that have been unloaded are placed here and there.

Losses:

i) Increased operating costs

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